“However, when the phrase, “a picture is worth a thousand words” came to mind, the distinction between seeing a Thing and thinking about the Thing suddenly occurred to me. It seemed to me that a picture could embody more than a thousand words. But what are those words?”

Chapter: Life Last but an Instant, p.7
 


“Think about this for a moment. As I am writing now, it is 10 o’clock p.m. in the east. It is seven o’clock p.m. in the west. There are “three hours” difference between “Time zones.” The phone rings and friends out west announce the birth of their first child. Now, think about this before you answer: What time was the telephone connection made; the time you first heard the voice on the other end of the line—ten or seven”?

Chapter: Numbers and Time or Energy Management, p.53


“We can get information about almost anything in seconds; all it takes is the touch of a finger. There is fast food, fast cars, fast access, instant coffee, instant messaging, instant this, that, and the other. Consequently, in the fog of such haste, there seems to be no Time to slow down long enough to actually experience our “Being” in our own presence in the Now. This gets more difficult as we become increasingly impatient with what is supposed to be “fast” or “instant”?

Chapter: One-Legged Man, p.26


“This brings me full circle to my understanding of Mindfulness as I described it in the beginning of the book, as living in Ism. Ism is living in harmony with what it “is” and not what I wish it to “be.” In other words, think of Ism as Perception looking into a mirror and seeing Reality for what it “is.” So it is with “Being” as I am and as everything is without judgment. I see the world for what it is and the world sees me for who I am.”

Chapter: Words Matter, p.75


“Nevertheless, I believe it is wise to be prepared, to be mentally nimble in any event because we can’t know before “Now” which alternative will be available and best for our lives at the time. At all times however, be mindful that Change is a chronic and inevitable side effect of the Constance of Time. With this in mind, it is important to consider that the further into the future your dreams live, the greater the likelihood the unforeseen or unexpected will pop up. This is true for the journey that is Life, a long road trip, a five-year goal, or a 50-year marriage. Murphy’s Law has nothing but Time on its hands”.

Chapter: We Can’t Know, We Must Not Know, And Thank God It Is So, p.97


“This is not as easy as it sounds, yet it is simple. Even so, it requires a commitment to take the Time to pay attention to the fullness of your own mindful “Being” in your own presence, your own “Now” as often as you can. Here again, I am talking about Mindfulness. This practice has made a difference in my Life and I’m now better able to “Be” in harmony with Life in Time as I am and as everything is without judgment. This helps with my volitional ability to perceptively slow down a couple of seconds so that I am better able to set my own pace, physically and mentally.”

Chapter: Only One or Two Seconds Longer; Children Do It, p.59


“One of the unyielding influences of Modernity is that we are often drunk with the many, many choices we face every day and the seemingly uncontrollable impulse to choose something else”.

Chapter: Drunk With Choices, p.135


“Throwing your hands up in the air and asking, “Why is this happening to me?” only keeps you in a bad Moment longer than you might otherwise be. This allows for the onset of stress and the delay of your arrival at what may be the next available exit (Thought) that could get you to a better place, a Mindful place, where you can “Do” sooner rather than later”.

Chapter: First Things First in The Present Positive Tense, p.139


“A high degree of commitment is required if you are to achieve your goal. Realize that “Attaining many things in life is much easier than making the commitment to actually attain them.” In the words of Zig Ziglar, you have to be the “Bacon,” not the “Egg” in a “Bacon and Egg” breakfast. Here the chicken is merely involved but the pig is committed. You see, the chicken can always lay another egg. But, the pig gives his life so you may have bacon. Now, that’s commitment.”.

Chapter: S.U.C.C.E.S.S., p.89 


“It is important that our focus be on “Being” aware that living is a “doing” proposition fueled by emotions and steered by our thoughts. Of course, if we are to take control, we must first “Be” so that we may “Do” in terms of choosing how we want to live while in the belly of the Beast. Being able to recognize its influences makes it easier to resist them, and resist them we should because the Ads that keep calling you back again and again for the latest fix will not stop running. Time is the currency required to keep those Ads running and the Beast has nothing but Time on its side. On the other hand, for you and me, the exhaustible nature of Life is usually announced in the one Ad we will never live to read; our obituary”.

Chapter: Doing, p.163


“Like you perhaps, and many others in similar situations, we were conflicted with feeling very sad that Mom had run out of Life and that we had lost her forever, while at the same time feeling “glad,” she suffered no more. For my beloved wife and the mother of our beautiful daughters, Death was her last best friend. She was finally free from her broken body as she slipped into the Eternal awakening on the other side of Time, in heaven”.

Chapter: Her Last Best Friend and The Living Monument We Continue to Build for Her, p.104